Food insensitivity

And I’m not talking about breaking out in hives after eating peanuts.

Have you ever paused to consider why some kind of food, perfectly acceptable in some cultures and countries, are totally a no-no for you? Not because you don’t like them – you haven’t even tasted them in your life – but you can’t even entertain the thought of consuming them. You have put them away on the list of “Food that I won’t ever have”. What brings such strong emotions to edible, palatable, even delicious food?

If you are an Indian, and a “non-veg”, stop and think about why you won’t eat cow’s meat. I’m not talking about eating it in India where political forces are at work. But if you are living in the US, (or Australia or Canada), and beef is generally the most accepted form of meat. Is it because of your upbringing, where you not only never had beef but were also told that it is against your culture, your religion? If it really is religion, then stop reading this post. I have nothing to offer you. But if it is some psychological barrier that you haven’t yet overcome, or even tried to overcome, then maybe it is time to address the real reason.

If you are an American, consider the following prospect: you are served a perfectly cooked plate of horse steak. Did you just throw up a little in your mouth? If yes, you’re not alone. According to this piece, eating horse meat was “abolished” on religious grounds. But in today’s world it has all to do with the perception that most Americans hold of horses. Ohh, so lovable creatures. I can’t possibly eat a horse, that’s preposterous! The same with dogs and guinea pigs, which are eaten in many parts of the world.

Now that I have managed to gross out all of my readers, let me point out the lack of sensitiveness we show when we hear about or, worse still, are actually offered to eat a food product that we – as individuals or as a collective society – have quite arbitrarily deemed not fit to be eaten. We flinch, we cringe our nose, our eyebrows arch up with the absurdity of the mere suggestion. That sends a powerful message to the person around you, who is completely at peace with eating whatever you feel is the last thing you’ll ever eat: that I’m being judged and judged to be BAD.

So, the next time someone says that they enjoy a certain food product you consider un-edible, do yourself a favour and stop showing signs of revulsion. And then go a step forward. Actually try out a new food!

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Categories: Culture, Rant | 1 Comment

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One thought on “Food insensitivity

  1. Steve Barrera

    Horse meat is great and Americans have enjoyed it abundantly in the past. Like languages, things change. Enjoy!

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